friday. by (x)99. on Flickr.

friday. by (x)99. on Flickr.

SN200315 by ]ezra[ on Flickr.

SN200315 by ]ezra[ on Flickr.

"The more cultured the bourgeois state, the more subtly it lied when declaring that schools could stand above politics and serve society as a whole. In fact the schools were turned into nothing but an instrument of the class rule of the bourgeoisie. They were thoroughly imbued with the bourgeois caste spirit. Their purpose was to supply the capitalists with obedient lackeys and able workers."

Vladimir Lenin. Speech At The First All-Russia Congress On Education. 1918. (via nakazn)

(Source: marxists.org)

Reblogged from cyborges with 319 notes

theofmoviestills:

The Shining | Stanley Kubrick | 1980

Reblogged from theofmoviestills with 1,623 notes

"The temporal structure of the subject is chiasmic: in the place of a substantial or self-determining “subject,” this juncture of discursive demands is something like a “crossroads,” to use Gloria Anzaldua’s phrase, a crossroads of cultural and political discursive forces, which she herself claims cannot be understood through the notion of the “subject.” There is no subject prior to its constructions; it is always the nexus, the non-space of cultural collision, in which the demand to resignify or repeat the very terms which constitute the “we” cannot be summarily refused, but neither can they be followed in strict obedience. It is the space of this ambivalence which opens up the possibility of a reworking of the very terms by which subjectivation proceeds—and fails to proceed."

Judith Butler, Bodies That Matter (via heteroglossia)

Reblogged from foucault-the-haters with 68 notes

"We are witnessing and sometimes personally experiencing a sharp de-classing of intellectuals. Our precious credentials are increasingly useless for generating income and — let us hope — social prestige, too. This should mean that most intellectuals view ourselves as sinking, economically, into the lower-middle or working class, and that “meritocratic” markers — the contents of our bookshelves and iPods; our degrees — accord us less and less social status in our own and others’ eyes. Not to say there won’t remain a self-protective cultural elite hoarding its prestige: the hostility to criticism among mutually appreciative writers, artists, and academics — an aversion to meaningful disputes — is contemporary evidence of such a siege mentality. But we can also hope for something else: perhaps intellectuals’ increasing exposure to socioeconomic danger will give a new political dangerousness and reality to what some of us produce. Might the continuing commitment of de-classed left intellectuals and radical artists to their vocations, in spite of withered prospects and eroding prestige, give our work an antisystemic force, and credibility, it has lacked?"

n plus 1: Cultural Revolution   (via celaenoo)

(Source: towerofsleep)

Reblogged from notational with 94 notes

"[I]n Nietzsche, individualism is accompanied by a lively critique of the notions of “self” and “I.” For Nietzsche there is a kind of dissolution of the self. The reaction against oppressive structures is no longer done, for him, in the name of a “self” or an “I.” On the contrary, it is as though the “self” and the “I” were accomplices of those structures."

Gilles Deleuze, "Nietzsche’s Burst of Laughter: Interview"  (via tiredshoes)

(Source: heteroglossia)

Reblogged from cyborges with 133 notes


Bruno Munari

Bruno Munari

(Source: shihlun)

Reblogged from cyborges with 361 notes

humoristics:

This is how Pop-Tarts are made, it’s kinda hypnotic

Here are some other gifs showing how stuff is made

humoristics:


This is how Pop-Tarts are made, it’s kinda hypnotic

Here are some other gifs showing how stuff is made

Reblogged from lustwithpassion with 680 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bieke Depoorter

After the Revolution: Interior lives in Egypt

The change demanded by tens of thousands of people in Tahrir Square more than three years ago came quickly and subsided even faster. The leader of three decades, Hosni Mubarak, finally stepped down; a democratic vote put the Muslim Brotherhood at the seat of power; and the nation’s army chief, who helped orchestrate a coup last July, resigned—only to run for president. That turmoil, along with a deadly crackdown on Islamists and attacks on the press, has made progress hard to pin down.

Bieke Depoorter, a photographer based in Ghent, Belgium, found a way to capture the often-unseen reality of a nation collapsing into its past. She would ask people on the streets of Cairo and other areas to stay a night in their homes. In each of her four several-week trips since late 2011, she would spend a few nights photographing, each time with a different family, then take a day off and repeat. She’s been to between 30 and 40 homes but denied entry from far more.

Depoorter, 27, doesn’t know Arabic, but the language barrier hasn’t proven a fault. “By not speaking, just being together, you can really get to know each other in a more thoughtful and real way,” she says. “People give me a lot and I give a lot, and it’s easier with strangers because they know I’m going away the next morning,” she adds. “It’s a very short, intense moment. It’s there and it will never come back.”




Via

Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia with 322 notes

poeticasvisuais:

Ruud van Empel - World (2005)

poeticasvisuais:

Ruud van Empel - World (2005)

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

Reblogged from poeticasvisuais with 3,795 notes

"You can create a system for yourself, but you will only become good when you break out of it."

Anton Stankowski (via design-is-fine)

Reblogged from design-is-fine with 87 notes